Welcome to the brand new Kenilworth Twinning Association Website.

Welcome to the brand new Kenilworth Twinning Association Website.

Welcome to the brand new Kenilworth Twinning Association Website.Welcome to the brand new Kenilworth Twinning Association Website.Welcome to the brand new Kenilworth Twinning Association Website.

KENILWORTH

  

Kenilworth is a town and civil parish in Warwickshire, England, about 6 miles (10 km) south-west of the centre of Coventry, 5 miles (8 km) north of Warwick and 90 miles (140 km) north-west of London. The town is on Finham Brook, a tributary of the River Sowe, which joins the River Avon about 2 miles (3 km) north-east of the town centre. The 2011 Census recorded a parish population of 22,413.[1] Kenilworth is noted for the extensive ruins of Kenilworth Castle. Other sights include the ruins of Kenilworth Abbey in Abbey Fields park, St Nicholas' Parish Church and the town's clock tower.

Kenilworth could almost be called a town built around a castle, yet it possesses ample evidence of both pre-historic and Roman occupation. The first Roman tile kiln in Warwickshire was situated near the town and is a pointer to there being a villa nearby. The first documentary evidence of the town was recorded in the Domesday Book in 1086.  A settlement existed at present day Kenilworth  which records it as Chinewrde, meaning "farm of a woman named Cynehild" 

Kenilworth Castle is an imposing sight. Although for the most part a ruin, it requires little imagination to visualise the grandeur of its Elizabethan days. It was founded in or around the year 1120 and Queen Elizabeth the First visited and stayed at the castle in 1575.

Sir Walter Scott wrote his famous novel "Kenilworth" while staying at the Kings Arms and Castle hotel in 1821.

Kenilworth (jpg)

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Kenilworth (jpg)

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Kenilworth (jpg)

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Kenilworth (jpg)

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